HORSE FEVER: A TALE OF SRI LANKA   2018  On the Beach Road of Polhena, a district of the city of Matara in Sri Lanka, among surf spots and guest houses full of tourists from all over the world, there's a small house build on top of a former one destroyed by the 2004 tsunami.  Everyday is crowded with locals who probably could not find England on the map but who know nevertheless that 15-2 on Standby Stan in the 2:50 at Portman Park is a tempting bet. Most of them can't read or speak English but they've taught themselves to recognise and write the names of British horses and jockeys. To them this is an extraordinary goal, they are as alien to the language as to Japanese and yet, on this former British colony, the urge to gamble is so great they have no choice.  Horse racing was banned as immoral on the island in the 1970s and ever since Sri Lankans have been avid followers of British racing. Crayford, Epsom and Lingfield are as familiar to many of these islanders as their own place names.  Sri Lanka is more than five hours ahead of Britain, all punters place their bets from early morning to late afternoon, before going to work, during the lunch break or after work, whenever they can, several times a day.  They sprint to the betting house the next morning to check the results. This sustains them with hope, they all go to bed thinking they could wake up a little bit richer.
       
     
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  HORSE FEVER: A TALE OF SRI LANKA   2018  On the Beach Road of Polhena, a district of the city of Matara in Sri Lanka, among surf spots and guest houses full of tourists from all over the world, there's a small house build on top of a former one destroyed by the 2004 tsunami.  Everyday is crowded with locals who probably could not find England on the map but who know nevertheless that 15-2 on Standby Stan in the 2:50 at Portman Park is a tempting bet. Most of them can't read or speak English but they've taught themselves to recognise and write the names of British horses and jockeys. To them this is an extraordinary goal, they are as alien to the language as to Japanese and yet, on this former British colony, the urge to gamble is so great they have no choice.  Horse racing was banned as immoral on the island in the 1970s and ever since Sri Lankans have been avid followers of British racing. Crayford, Epsom and Lingfield are as familiar to many of these islanders as their own place names.  Sri Lanka is more than five hours ahead of Britain, all punters place their bets from early morning to late afternoon, before going to work, during the lunch break or after work, whenever they can, several times a day.  They sprint to the betting house the next morning to check the results. This sustains them with hope, they all go to bed thinking they could wake up a little bit richer.
       
     

HORSE FEVER: A TALE OF SRI LANKA

2018

On the Beach Road of Polhena, a district of the city of Matara in Sri Lanka, among surf spots and guest houses full of tourists from all over the world, there's a small house build on top of a former one destroyed by the 2004 tsunami.

Everyday is crowded with locals who probably could not find England on the map but who know nevertheless that 15-2 on Standby Stan in the 2:50 at Portman Park is a tempting bet.
Most of them can't read or speak English but they've taught themselves to recognise and write the names of British horses and jockeys. To them this is an extraordinary goal, they are as alien to the language as to Japanese and yet, on this former British colony, the urge to gamble is so great they have no choice.

Horse racing was banned as immoral on the island in the 1970s and ever since Sri Lankans have been avid followers of British racing. Crayford, Epsom and Lingfield are as familiar to many of these islanders as their own place names.

Sri Lanka is more than five hours ahead of Britain, all punters place their bets from early morning to late afternoon, before going to work, during the lunch break or after work, whenever they can, several times a day.
They sprint to the betting house the next morning to check the results. This sustains them with hope, they all go to bed thinking they could wake up a little bit richer.

R0022126.jpg
       
     
R0021945.jpg
       
     
R0021795.jpg
       
     
R0023064.jpg
       
     
R0022946.jpg
       
     
R0021898.jpg
       
     
R0021886.jpg
       
     
R0023100.jpg
       
     
R0022933.jpg
       
     
R0021937.jpg
       
     
R0022982.jpg
       
     
R0022958.jpg
       
     
R0022281.jpg
       
     
R0021717.jpg